Highlights

North Shore Health Department Highlights 2/13/2018

Did You Know?

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month. Developing good habits at an early age and scheduling regular dental visits helps children to get a good start on a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry regularly recommends that children receive their first dental exam no later than one year of age to head off potential early dental problems. It is important for dentists to review certain areas of prevention with parents. This includes tooth decay, what thumb-sucking can do to baby teeth and how to get your child to become familiar with his or her dental office's surroundings. When children get older, attention should be focused on the prevention of crowded teeth and healthy gums, both achievable by seeing a dentist at least twice a year for an oral examination and professional cleaning. Here are some tips for good oral health:

  • Brush for two minutes, two times per day.
  • Flossing is important--show your children how to clean between teeth.
  • Drinking water with fluoride (called “nature’s cavity fighter”) is an easy way to help prevent cavities.
  • Limit sugary snacks and drinks between meals.
  • See the dentist regularly for family checkups, and ask them about sealants and fluoride.
  • Establish good dental hygiene habits early. When your child is 12 months old, you can begin using toothpaste when brushing his or her teeth.
  • Serve as a good role model by practicing good dental hygiene habits yourself.
  • Check your child’s mouth for the signs of periodontal disease, including bleeding gums, swollen and bright red gums, gums that are receding away from the teeth and bad breath.

For more information visit: https://www.ada.orghttps://www.cdc.gov/features/childrens-dental-health/index.html


North Shore Health Department Highlights 2/6/2018

Did You Know?

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. Dating violence is more common than many people think. One in three teens in the U.S. will experience physical, sexual or emotional abuse by someone they are in a relationship with before they become adults. And nearly half (43%) of dating college women report experiencing violent and abusive dating behaviors.

Dating abuse can come in different forms.

·         Physical: hitting, slapping, choking, kicking, shoving, biting

·         Emotional/Verbal: insulting, critiquing in public, directing what to do or wear

·         Financial: taking paychecks or money, preventing someone from working

·         Digital: sending threats on social media or over texts, demanding passwords to digital accounts

·         Sexual: pressuring to do anything sexual without consent

In 2017 in Wisconsin, among high school teens who participated in the Youth Risk Behavior Survey:

·         7.2% of students were ever physically forced to have sexual intercourse (when they did not want to).

·         16.1% of gay, lesbian or bisexual students were physically forced to have sexual intercourse (when they did not want to).

·         10.2 % of students who dated or went out with someone during the 12 months before the survey experienced sexual dating violence in the previous year.

·         6.9% of students who dated or went out with someone during the 12 months before the survey experienced physical dating violence in the previous year.

If you are the parent of a teenager, take the initiative this February to speak with your teen about teen dating violence. For more information visit: https://www.teendvmonth.org/talk-teen-dating-violence/ 


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SPECIAL MESSAGE

It’s time for the Community Health Survey!
 
Every three years, the health care systems and public health departments in Milwaukee County partner to gather information on the health and health behaviors of our residents. 2018 is the third year of the cycle, so a survey year. Phone calls will begin on January 8th. If your landline or cell phone shows a 414 area code number from “Management Decisions,” please answer the call and help us gather data to increase our knowledge and focus our resources on health issues.  



North Shore Health Department Highlights 1/30/2018

Did You Know?

Substance abuse refers to a set of related conditions associated with the consumption of mind- and behavior-altering substances, such as drugs and alcohol, that have negative behavioral and health outcomes. Substance abuse has a major impact on individuals, families, and communities. The effects of substance abuse significantly contribute to social, physical, mental, and public health problems. In the North Shore and in Wisconsin most deaths are associated with multiple drug use, including heroin, opioid medications, depressants, anti-anxiety and antidepressants, alcohol, and other substances.

People can become addicted to illegal drugs and to drugs that doctors prescribe such as painkillers like morphine or oxycodone. People can also become addicted to things they may not think of as drugs, such as alcohol and the nicotine in cigarettes. Some drugs may cause addiction more easily than others. If you think you may have an addiction, take a step towards breaking that addiction by following some of these tips:

  • Commit to quitting- once you decide to quit, make a plan to make sure you follow through
  • Get help from your doctor- Your doctor can give you support and help you find a treatment program that meets your needs. Your doctor can also treat withdrawal symptoms and other problems that you may have as you recover from your addiction.
  • Get support. Ask your family and friends for support. You can also view resources in our Heroin, Opioid, and Prescription Drug Information and Resource Guide at: http://www.nshealthdept.org/heroin

Please join us tonight, January 30th at 5:30pm for Stairway to Heroin at Shorewood High School to learn how you can be part of the solution to this ever-growing concern in our community. View event details here http://www.nshealthdept.org/Portals/NsHealthDept.org/sth.pdf

For more information visit: https://www.drugabuse.gov/ , https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/

North Shore Health Department Highlights 1/23/2018

Did You Know?

The North Shore Health Department, by State Statute (Chapter 254.11) and Administrative Rules (DHS 181) follows up on reports of elevated blood lead levels per guidelines outlined by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS). We receive reports from DHS for all children living in North Shore municipalities who have a capillary finger prick test or a venous blood draw to test for blood lead levels. Blood lead level tests are given by a child’s primary care provider.

Children living in the North Shore (and other Wisconsin cities outside of Milwaukee and Racine) are to be assessed for lead exposure with physicians asking four questions:

  1. Enrolled in Medicaid or WIC?
  2. Live in a building built before 1950?
  3. Live in a building built before 1978 with remodeling?
  4. Have a sibling with lead poisoning?

If any of these answers are yes, children should have a blood lead test at 12 months and 24 months or if 3-5 years old and not previously tested. If the screening result is <5 mcg/dl, further testing is not needed.North Shore children living in older homes should be tested at least twice.

The primary source of elevated blood lead levels is lead-based paint and lead-containing household dust, especially around windows. Secondary sources of lead exposure can include soil, drinking water, imported jewelry and toys, antiques, imported dishes, and traditional (“folk”) remedies. Lead exposure can also occur with jobs or hobbies where lead is involved.

If you are doing remodeling in a home that was built before 1978, be sure to hire a certified lead safe renovation company. The current list can be found at:https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/lead/company-list.htm

If you would like to test your water for the presence of lead, test bottles can be picked up at either of our offices. You must then set up an account with the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene for the test to be completed. Current cost is $29 plus shipping.

Learn more about preventing lead exposure at: https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/

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SPECIAL MESSAGE

It’s time for the Community Health Survey!
 
Every three years, the health care systems and public health departments in Milwaukee County partner to gather information on the health and health behaviors of our residents. 2018 is the third year of the cycle, so a survey year. Phone calls will begin on January 8th. If your landline or cell phone shows a 414 area code number from “Management Decisions,” please answer the call and help us gather data to increase our knowledge and focus our resources on health issues.  


North Shore Health Department Highlights 1/16/2018

Did You Know?

It is not too late to get your flu shot!  Health Departments throughout the region are seeing an increase in numbers of people hospitalized with influenza, with some requiring admission to intensive care units and even requiring the use of mechanical ventilation.  Flu is NOT just a “bad cold”- it is potentially fatal.  The North Shore Health Department has reviewed the flu hospitalization records and compared them to the state database for flu shots.   Individuals who were hospitalized for influenza and received a flu vaccination did not require admission to an intensive care unit or mechanical ventilation, indicating that the flu vaccine may have lessened the severity of their illness.  

A common misconception about the flu shot is that it can give you the flu. A flu vaccine is made with an inactivated virus, and therefore cannot cause disease. It does take about two weeks for your body to build immunity after receiving a flu shot, so the sooner you get your shot, the sooner you’re protected.  People who are very sick or who are at high risk of serious flu complications and get flu symptoms should be treated with antiviral drugs as soon as possible. Get vaccinated if you haven’t yet. There are still weeks of flu activity to come. Call the North Shore Health Department at 414-371-2980 to schedule your flu shot today. You can visit our website at http://www.nshealthdept.org/Clinics.aspx to check upcoming clinic times and request an appointment online. 

Common symptoms of the Flu:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

To get more information on flu symptoms and prevention visit: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm

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SPECIAL MESSAGE

It’s time for the Community Health Survey!
 
Every three years, the health care systems and public health departments in Milwaukee County partner to gather information on the health and health behaviors of our residents. 2018 is the third year of the cycle, so a survey year. Phone calls will begin on January 8th. If your landline or cell phone shows a 414 area code number from “Management Decisions,” please answer the call and help us gather data to increase our knowledge and focus our resources on health issues.  


North Shore Health Department Highlights 1/9/2018

Did You Know?

January 7-13 is Folic Acid Awareness Week. Folic acid is a B-vitamin that is necessary for proper cell growth. If taken before and during early pregnancy, folic acid can prevent up to 70% of some serious birth defects of the brain and spine, called neural tube defects. The CDC recommends that all women between the ages of 15 and 45 take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid daily to prevent two types of neural tube defects--spina bifida and anencephaly. Since these birth defects develop within the first few weeks of pregnancy, it is important to have enough folic acid in your body BEFORE becoming pregnant and to continue getting enough folic acid during early pregnancy.  It is important for women of childbearing age to take folic acid even if pregnancy is not planned because half of pregnancies in the United States are unplanned.  Taking a multivitamin with folic acid every day is the easiest way that women can get the recommended amount of 400 mcg.

Vitamin D is also an important vitamin to take during the winter months—not just for pregnant women. Vitamin D aids in absorption of calcium and helps cells all over your body, including bone, nerve, muscle and immune cells. Supplements are a good way to get vitamin D if you can’t get enough sunlight, or if you’re worried about exposing your skin. Vitamin D3 is the best kind of supplement to take. Ask your doctor what level of supplementation you should take, as many health issues may affect vitamin D levels.

To learn more visit: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/folicacid/index.htmlhttps://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

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SPECIAL MESSAGE

It’s time for the Community Health Survey!
 
Every three years, the health care systems and public health departments in Milwaukee County partner to gather information on the health and health behaviors of our residents. 2018 is the third year of the cycle, so a survey year. Phone calls will begin on January 8th. If your landline or cell phone shows a 414 area code number from “Management Decisions,” please answer the call and help us gather data to increase our knowledge and focus our resources on health issues.  


North Shore Health Department Highlights 1/2/2018

Did You Know?

January is Radon Action Month! Indoor radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), radon-induced lung cancer kills 21,000 Americans every year.  Smoking combined with radon exposure poses additional lifetime risks of getting lung cancer.  If you want to start the year off healthy, do it from the ground up and test your home for radon. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is present in the ground and can enter homes through their foundations. It forms naturally from the decay of radioactive elements which are found at different levels in soil and rock around the base and under the home. That is why radon levels vary from home to home, and the only way to know if you have high levels is to test your own home. Radon levels are usually highest in the basement and levels peak in the winter months when windows and doors that would otherwise help to vent the gas are closed. To assess the magnitude of the problem in your home, it is therefore best to test in the winter months.  

The health department has radon kits available for $6.00 at the Shorewood and Brown Deer offices. If you have questions about radon, call us at 414-371-2980 or visit the following websites:

https://www.epa.gov/radon

https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/radon/index.htm

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SPECIAL MESSAGE

It’s time for the Community Health Survey!
 
Every three years, the health care systems and public health departments in Milwaukee County partner to gather information on the health and health behaviors of our residents. 2018 is the third year of the cycle, so a survey year. Phone calls will begin on January 8th. If your landline or cell phone shows a 414 area code number from “Management Decisions,” please answer the call and help us gather data to increase our knowledge and focus our resources on health issues.  



North Shore Health Department Highlights 12/27/2017

Did you know?

New Year's Eve is a night to have fun and celebrate the coming year. However, safety is a must when participating in the festivities. Whether you're staying in and celebrating with friends and family, or you're traveling to a party, following a few safety tips will ensure that you're safe and sound when the clock strikes midnight, ringing in the New Year!

  • Designate a Driver: If you are going to be driving New Year's Eve, don't drink and drive. If you have a friend who does not prefer to drink, make sure they take the wheel.
  • Monitor your Alcohol Intake: Be sure to pay attention to how much you and others are consuming. Drinking too much alcohol can have lethal affects. Be responsible.
  • Don't use fireworks: Fireworks frequently make 'celebratory' appearances at New Year's Eve parties. But it might not be a good idea with the holiday crowds.
  • If you plan to drink, eat before you do so: Never drink on an empty stomach. Make sure to eat a full meal before drinking, and continue snacking while drinking. Eating while drinking will slow down the absorption of alcohol in the digestive track. This gives the alcohol more time to metabolize in the body. Aim to eat foods high in protein such as cheese, meat, and nuts.
  • If you plan to go out, go with a group of friends/family: The best New Year’s Eves are spent with loved ones. If you’re going to a party or heading to a public event, make plans to arrive and leave with a group. A lot can happen on New Year’s Eve, and you want to ensure you, your friends and family are safe, so be sure to share your plans for the night and communicate your whereabouts if plans change. 


North Shore Health Department Highlights 12/19/2017

Did you know?

A new social host law went into effect in Wisconsin on December 11th, 2017. In Wisconsin, the term “social host” describes an adult (age 18 or older) who allows or fails to take action to prevent underage drinking in a location they own, rent occupy, and control. The new law reduces youth access to alcohol by making it illegal for an adult to provide a location for underage drinking anywhere in Wisconsin. It applies to:

  • Adults (age 18 and older)
  • Who “knowingly permit” or “fail to take action to prevent” underage drinking
  • On property the adult owns and occupies OR
  • Occupied by the adult and under their control such as homes, hotels, campgrounds, cabins, etc.

A first offense violation carries a $500 fine.  Like driving under the influence, the first offense is not a crime. Subsequent offenses within a certain time period can also include imprisonment – ranging from 30 days to up to 9 months.  There are exemptions to the law which include:

  • Alcohol provided as part of a religious service; and
  • Alcohol served to underage persons accompanied by their parent, guardian, or spouse of legal drinking age

Underage drinking is a serious public health concern and the consequences can affect everyone regardless of age or drinking status. There are community programs to help reduce underage drinking such as Parents Who Host, Lose the Most.  This program educates parents about the health and safety risks of providing alcohol to teenagers and increases awareness of and compliance with underage drinking laws. Visit https://preventionactionalliance.org to learn more.

To learn more about the new law visit: https://wicancer.org/wp-content/uploads/social-host-Combined-Final-11-17-002.pdf


North Shore Health Department Highlights 12/12/17

Did you know?

The North Shore has a high percentage of residents age 65 and older. According to the 2010 US census, 17.3% of North Shore residents fall into that age category, compared to 11.5% in Milwaukee County and 13.8% in Wisconsin. The North Shore Health Department (NSHD) supports older adults in our community with several programs and services.

1.       Remembering When group presentations: NSHD partners with North Shore Fire/Rescue (NSFR) to provide group presentations, as developed by the National Fire Protection Association. Some presentation topics cover Preparedness, First Aid, and How to Get the Most from Your Doctor Visit. Contact us if you would like a presentation tailored to your group.

2.       Remembering When home safety assessments: These assessments include a home safety (including fire risk) assessment by a member of NSFR and a functional fall risk assessment by a registered nurse from the NSHD. The functional fall assessments, based on the CDC’s STEADI Toolkit, can be done in the home or either health department office, by appointment.

3.       Blood pressure screenings: NSHD nurses provide blood pressure monitoring at community locations each month. visit www.nshealthdept.org/clinics for clinic dates/times.

4.       Homebound flu Immunizations: NSHD provides flu shots for older adults and others unable to leave home to get this important yearly vaccine.

5.       Referrals: NSHD may provide referrals/resources in response to calls from an older adult, the older adult’s family or based on a referral from NSFR. Some resources include Community Based Waiver programs, home delivered meals, Interfaith programs, congregate meals and in-home supportive services.

The NSHD is currently exploring additional program opportunities that will benefit the older adults in our community.   These may include the Stepping On program--an evidence based program aimed at reducing the incident of falls among older adults, and a community-wide survey to identify barriers to healthy aging in the North Shore.  


North Shore Health Department Highlights 12/05/2017

Did You Know?

World AIDS Day is observed each year on December 1 and is an opportunity for people to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV, and remember those who have died. HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) if not treated. Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely and once you get HIV, you have it for life. An estimated 1,122,900 adults and adolescents were living with HIV at the end of 2015 in the United States.

HIV can be transmitted by:

  • Sexual Contact
  • Sharing needles to inject drugs
  • Mother to baby during pregnancy or breastfeeding

Protect yourself from HIV:

  • Get tested once or more often if you are at risk
  • Use condoms every time you have sex
  • Limit your number of sex partners
  • Don’t inject drugs, if you do, do not share needles
  • Get tested and treated for other sexually transmitted diseases
  • If you think you’ve been exposed to HIV within the last 3 days, ask a health care provider about postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) right away. PEP can prevent HIV, but it must be started within 72 hours.
  • If you are at high risk of getting HIV consider taking Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP). PrEP is when people at very high risk for HIV take HIV medicines daily to lower their chances of getting infected. PrEP can stop HIV from taking hold and spreading throughout your body. It is highly effective for preventing HIV if used as prescribed, but it is much less effective when not taken consistently.

Currently, there is no effective cure for HIV. With proper medical care, HIV can be controlled. Treatment for HIV is called antiretroviral therapy (ART). If taken the right way, every day, ART can dramatically prolong the lives of many people infected with HIV, keep them healthy, and greatly lower their chance of infecting others.

To learn more visit: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/whatishiv.html  
 

North Shore Health Department Highlights 11/28/2017

Did You Know?

The North Shore Health Department (NSHD) strives to promote and protect the health and safety of the people in the North Shore. One of the ways we protect the health and safety of our residents is by responding to communicable/infectious diseases. A communicable disease, also known as an infectious disease, is an illness transmitted through direct contact with an infected individual or animal – or indirectly through contact with a vector such as a mosquito, tick or plant, with blood or bodily fluids, or by breathing in an airborne virus or bacteria. As part of Wisconsin State Statute, 252 – Communicable Diseases, the NSHD is required to follow up and respond to all Category I and II diseases and conditions considered to have significant public health impact.

Some reportable diseases include Salmonella, E.coli, Mumps, Measles, Tuberculosis, etc. Some diseases are preventable through vaccination (i.e Measles, Mumps, Chicken Pox). If you are unsure if you have been vaccinated for a certain disease you can visit the Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR) at https://www.dhfswir.org to access your immunization record. If you do not have a record, your physician can order antibody testing to test for immunity. The presence of IgG antibodies means a person is immune through either vaccination or a past infection. The presence of IgM antibodies shows a current or recent infection.

If you are diagnosed with a reportable disease, your local health department may be contacting you. It is important to help stop the spread of germs by avoiding close contact with people when sick and staying home from work and school. This will help stop the spread of disease and also allow time for you to get well!

Visit CDC.gov for more tips and information.



North Shore Health Department Highlights 11/21/2017

Did You Know?

National Diabetes Month is observed every November so individuals, health care professionals, organizations, and communities across the country can bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can help reduce its impact on your life. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at higher risk for serious health complications including heart disease and stroke, blindness and eye problems, kidney disease, and amputations. You can help reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes by eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing weight.  Unfortunately, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that can’t be prevented. Controlling your blood sugar levels can help you avoid or delay these serious health complications. Living with diabetes can be difficult, but health lifestyle choices can give you more control over them. Some tips include:

Every day: stay active, eat a healthy diet, and take medication if prescribed; check feet for redness, swelling, pain, or sores.
Each health care visit (several times a year): get a blood pressure check and foot check.
Twice a year: get an A1C test and dental checkup.
Once a year: get a cholesterol test and kidney function test, visit your podiatrist (foot doctor) and eye doctor.

If you have any of the following diabetes symptoms, see your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested: urinate (pee) a lot, often at night, are very thirsty, losing weight without trying, are very hungry, blurry vision, numbness or tingling hands or feet, feeling very tired, very dry skin, sores that heal slowly, and have more infections than usual.

To learn more about diabetes visit: https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/home/index.html , https://www.niddk.nih.gov/ ,



North Shore Health Department Highlights 11/14/2017

Did You Know?

The American Cancer Society has set aside the third Thursday of November for the Great American Smokeout event. This event encourages smokers to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance to stop smoking that day. By quitting, even for 1 day, smokers will be taking an important step toward a healthier life and reducing their cancer risk. Take the first step on November 16th.

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers, and is the leading cause of cancer death among men and women. You can lower your risk of lung cancer by quitting smoking, getting your home tested for radon, avoiding exposure to cancer causing chemicals, and eating a healthy diet with a lot of fruits and vegetables. Some common symptoms of lung cancer include:

  • A cough that does not go away/coughing up blood
  • Chest pain/shortness of breath
  • Weight loss
  • Infections (bronchitis, pneumonia) that keep coming back

The best way to reduce your risk of lung cancer is to quit smoking. About 36.5 million Americans still smoke cigarettes, and tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States. Quitting smoking has immediate and long-term benefits at any age.

Call the Wisconsin Tobacco Quit Line at 1-800-QUIT NOW (800-784-8669) for more information and resources on quitting.
 
For more information on lung cancer visit www.cancer.org
 
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Health Insurance Market Place Deadline Reminder

If you don’t have health insurance through your employer, Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or another source that provides qualifying health coverage, the Marketplace can help you get covered. The 2018 Open Enrollment Period runs from November 1, 2017 to December 15, 2017. For more information visit: https://www.healthcare.gov/quick-guide/dates-and-deadlines/



North Shore Health Department Highlights 11/7/17

Did You Know?

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. Cigarette smoking is the number one cause of lung cancer, but use of other tobacco products also increases the risk. Although cigarette use is dropping among Wisconsin’s youth, other newer tobacco products are gaining popularity fast. And that’s not good, because there’s no such thing as a safe tobacco product. Designed to deliver nicotine—a highly addictive additive that can keep kids hooked for life—these new tobacco products come in a wide range of shapes and styles and are designed to mimic common candies and mints. Thirteen percent of Wisconsin high school students report using e-cigarettes, compared to 8 percent who use conventional cigarettes according to the 2016 High School Youth Tobacco Survey. Among those who use e-cigarettes, over 88 percent of high school teens say they wouldn’t try e-cigarettes if they weren’t flavored.

You don’t have to be an expert to talk to your kids about the dangers of tobacco use. Let your kids know how you feel about tobacco and make sure they have the facts they need to make healthy decisions on their own. Here are a few tips that can help:

Make it personal: Most people who use tobacco want to quit. If you or someone you love has struggled with nicotine addiction or a tobacco-related illness, talk to your kids about it.

Focus on right now: Young people can have difficulty imagining long-term health effects, like cancer or lung disease. The immediate costs of tobacco use—shortness of breath, mouth sores, yellow teeth, and addiction—are much easier for them to relate to.

Talk about social costs: Nobody wants to smell bad, have yellow teeth and bad breath, or get red and itchy eyes. Encourage your child to think about the impact tobacco can have on first impressions.

Remember, tobacco-free is popular: There are so many tobacco products in stores and ads and YouTube videos, it’s easy for kids to believe that “everybody is doing it.” In fact, most Wisconsin youth have never used tobacco. Remind your kids that living tobacco free is the popular choice.

Ask them to ask: Make sure your child knows they can always ask you about tobacco products (instead of turning to Google, YouTube, or classmates and friends). You may not know everything, but you can find the answers together.

The Department of Health Services (DHS) has launched a campaign to inform parents about brightly packaged, candy-flavored tobacco products targeted to appeal to children. Learn more about the “Tobacco is Changing” campaign, including photos of the flavored products at: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/tobaccoischanging/index.htm