Highlights

North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/29/2018

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month. Hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C are three types of viral hepatitis that cause inflammation of the liver. While each can produce similar symptoms, each hepatitis virus affects the liver differently.

Unlike Hepatitis B and C which can turn into chronic illness, Hepatitis A is a short-term illness that is caused by infection with the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A was once very common in the United States, but the number of cases that occur each year is now less than 3,000. Hepatitis A is a liver disease spread by contaminated food and water.  It can also be spread from the hands of a person with hepatitis A. It is rarely spread through sexual contact. Symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and jaundice. Some people have no symptoms, while others have symptoms that last 1-6 months. Most people recover with no lasting liver damage.

Hepatitis A is easily prevented with a safe and effective vaccine, which is recommended for all children at one year of age and for adults who may be at risk, including travelers to certain international countries. Here are some tips if you are traveling overseas:

  • Avoid eating raw fruits and vegetables, and raw shellfish
  • Avoid iced drinks or adding ice to your drinks
  • Drink bottled water or boil water before drinking
  • Brush your teeth and rinse your mouth with bottled water
  • Avoid eating at unhygienic places

For more information visit: https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hepavaccinationbeforetravel.htm

https://www.vaccines.gov/diseases/hepatitis_a/index.html

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/22/2018


Did you know?

Wisconsin has declared May 2018 as Trauma-Informed Care Awareness Month and May 22, 2018 as Trauma-Informed Care Day in Wisconsin. Trauma-informed Care (TIC) is not a therapy, intervention, or specific action. It is an approach to engaging people with histories of trauma that recognizes the presence of trauma symptoms and acknowledges the role that trauma has played in their lives. Trauma is extreme stress that overwhelms a person's ability to cope. It can be an event, a series of events, or set of circumstances that harms a person's physical or emotional well-being. The essence of TIC comes down to the question of not, ‘What's wrong with you? but, ‘What happened to you?’ This shift in perspective leads to answers that get at that root cause of issues.

There are four elements of a trauma-informed approach:

Realizing the prevalence of trauma - Many individuals experience trauma during their lifetime. Nationally, 61 percent men and 51 percent of women will experience at least one trauma in their lifetime.

Recognizing how trauma affects individuals - Research shows that trauma disrupts the central nervous system and overwhelms a person's ability to cope. It often results in feeling vulnerable, helpless, and afraid. It interferes with relationships and fundamental beliefs about oneself, others, and one's place in the world.

Responding by putting this knowledge into practice - This approach lessens the blame on people who have had adverse experiences in their lives and instead acknowledges it may not be their fault they are acting badly. It shows the person that there is an understanding that their past experiences may be affecting their present behavior. This promotes healing.

Resisting traumatization - TIC takes steps to minimize situations that could cause distress or mirror the person's traumatic experiences.

To learn more about TIC visit:

https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/tic/index.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index.html

https://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/trauma-interventions

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/15/2018


Did you know?

Keeping up-to-date immunization records for yourself and your family is important. Your vaccination record provides a history of all the vaccines you received as a child and adult. This record may be required for certain jobs, travel, or school or daycare registration. Every year thousands of children and adults in the U.S. become sick from vaccine-preventable diseases which can be easily spread from person to person.

There has been an increase of cases of mumps and measles in Wisconsin in the last couple of years. The North Shore Health Department is notified when someone who lives or works in our jurisdiction tests positive for a one of these diseases. The Health Department’s job is to protect the community from getting sick and control an outbreak. To do this, local health departments have the authority to exclude individuals from public activities, such as going to work or school, if they do not provide proof of immunity. Proof of immunity includes:

  • Birth before January 1st, 1957 (unless health care personnel).
  • Serologic proof of immunity-  If you remember having measles or mumps as a child, you can get a blood test to check for your immunity. This blood test is called a titer.
  • Documentation of adequate vaccination with MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) vaccine.

In certain situation you are able to receive a post exposure vaccine to avoid exclusion from public activities. You can locate your immunization record on the Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR) https://www.dhswir.org/PR/clientSearch.do?language=en.  If you are unable to locate your record on WIR or have not received your MMR vaccine, contact your physician to discuss your record or if you should be vaccinated.

To view immunization schedules and what other vaccines you may need visit: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/8/2018

Did you know? 


May is National Stroke Awareness Month, an observance that highlights the importance of knowing the signs and symptoms of stroke and encourages people to take action. Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of severe disability. Living a healthy lifestyle (e.g., being physically active, eating more fruits and vegetables and foods low in sodium and salt, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding smoking) can reduce the chances of having a stroke. Properly managing certain medical conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, and diabetes can also lower the risk.

A stroke is an emergency – it can happen to anyone, at any time, and at any age. Save a life by having a better understanding of stroke and by knowing what signs and symptoms to look for.

Use FAST to remember the warning signs of a stroke:

F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

T—Time: If you see any of these signs, call 9-1-1 right away.

To learn more visit: https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/signs_symptoms.htm , www.stroke.org , or www.strokeassociation.org

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/1/2018

Did you know?

May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month.  Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. It is transmitted through the bite of certain species of blacklegged ticks.  The geographic distribution of Lyme disease is highly regional--approximately 95% of confirmed Lyme disease cases are reported from the upper Midwest, New England, and the mid-Atlantic states. There were 1,491 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Wisconsin in 2016.  Residents and travelers in areas where Lyme disease is common—including areas in Northern Wisconsin--should protect themselves. To help prevent Lyme disease, the CDC recommends the following: 

  • Avoid areas with tall grass and brush where ticks are common
  • Apply repellents that contain at least 20%–30% DEET
  • Wear clothing treated with 0.5% permethrin
  • Shower soon after coming indoors
  • Seek health care promptly if symptoms of Lyme disease develop, including fever, rash, and muscle or joint pain.

For more information on Lyme Disease, including photos of blacklegged ticks, what the characteristic Erythema rash looks like, and how to safely remove a tick, visit http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

For a map showing Lyme disease incidence in Wisconsin by county, visit https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/tickborne/lyme/2016data.htm


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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 4/24/2018

Did you know?

The World Health Organization (WHO) has proclaimed April 24-30, 2018 World Immunization Week.  This week is dedicated to promoting the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Immunization saves millions of lives and is widely recognized as one of the world’s most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Immunizations have positively impacted the lives of infants, children and adults.

Why should you vaccinate?

Immunizations can save your child’s life. Because of advances in medical science, your child can be protected against more diseases than ever before. Some diseases that once injured or killed thousands of children, have been eliminated completely and others are close to extinction.

Vaccination is very safe and effective. Vaccines are only given after a long and careful review by scientists, doctors, and healthcare professionals. The disease-prevention benefits of getting vaccines are much greater than the possible side effects for almost all children.

Immunization protects others you care about.  People in the U.S. still get vaccine-preventable diseases. In fact, we have seen resurgences of measles and whooping cough (pertussis) over the past few years. It is important that you and your children who are able to get vaccinated are fully immunized.  Immunizing individual children also helps to protect the health of our community, especially those people who cannot be immunized (children who are too young to be vaccinated, or those who can’t receive certain vaccines for medical reasons), and the small proportion of people who don’t respond to a particular vaccine.

Immunizations can save your family time and money. A child with a vaccine-preventable disease can be denied attendance at schools or child care facilities. Some vaccine-preventable diseases can result in prolonged disabilities and can take a financial toll because of lost time at work and medical bills. 

Immunization protects those around you as well as future generations. Vaccines have reduced and, in some cases, eliminated many diseases that killed or severely disabled people just a few generations ago.

The North Shore Health Department prevents vaccine preventable diseases through our Immunization Program. Immunizations are provided to uninsured, underinsured and in some limited cases for some vaccines, private payers. Additionally, the health department provides education and outreach to residents, healthcare providers, school nurses, media, and others on the epidemiology of vaccine-preventable diseases and current vaccine recommendations.

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 4/17/2018

Did you know?


April is STD (Sexually Transmitted Disease) Awareness Month. There’s no avoiding the statistics: cases of gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis are at an all-time high. Left untreated, STDs can cause increased risk of giving or getting HIV, long-term pelvic and/or abdominal pain, and inability to get pregnant, or pregnancy complications. How can you protect yourself? 

·         Vaccinating- Vaccines are safe, effective. vaccines are available for hepatitis B and HPV. Ask your doctor whether these are right for you.

·         Reducing number of sex partners- Reducing your number of sex partners can decrease your risk for STDs. It is still important that you and your partner get tested, and that you share your test results with one another. 

·         Condoms-Correct and consistent use of the male latex condom is highly effective in reducing STD transmission. Use a condom every time you have anal, vaginal, or oral sex. 

·         Mutual Monogamy- Mutual monogamy means that you agree to be sexually active with only one person, who has agreed to be sexually active only with you. 

·         Abstinence: The most reliable way to avoid infection is to not have sex.


If you are sexually active, you are at risk of infection, and testing is the only way to know if you have an STD. Many STDs are curable and all are treatable. If either you or your partner has an STD that can be cured, both of you need to start treatment immediately to avoid getting re-infected. Getting treated right away can also help avoid health problems down the road.

This year’s STD Awareness Month theme is “Treat Me Right.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourage you to ask your healthcare provider what you can do – and how you can work together – to ensure that you stay healthy. Some providers may not discuss sex or STD testing with you. Bring it up if they don’t. Arm yourself with the facts and know what you should expect.

Learn more about specific STDs at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/healthcomm/fact_sheets.htm

If you need to get tested, you can visit your primary care provider.

Uninsured or Underinsured?

Keenan Health Center, Milwaukee: Provides free screening and treatment. Visit this link to learn morehttp://city.milwaukee.gov/health/clinic-Services.htm#.V4UCMPkrK00

Brady East STD Clinic, Milwaukee: Provides free screening and treatment. Visit this link to learn morehttp://www.bestd.org/services/

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 4/10/2018

Did you know?

Drivers today are more distracted than ever. From texting to eating to settling sibling disputes in the back seat, there are countless distractions that can fatefully take your focus off the road. April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month, a united effort to recognize and eliminate preventable deaths from distracted driving. With technology advancing at a rapid pace, it is more common to have technology including cell phones, navigation systems, and other items in a vehicle. The latest statistics show motor vehicle fatalities are up 6% from 2015. More than 40,000 people were killed on our nation's roadways last year, and distracted driving is a major contributor.

What are the laws in Wisconsin?

• Texting while driving is against WI law for any driver unless operating an emergency vehicle
• Wisconsin drivers are required to use hands-free devices through areas of road construction
• Wisconsin officers can cite drivers for any distracted driving violation
• Cell phone usage while driving is prohibited for novice drivers with learner’s permits or an intermediate license
• It’s illegal to have any electronic device providing entertainment value by visual means located in the view of the driver, unless a commercial driver

We can all play a part in the fight to save lives by ending distracted driving. If you feel strongly about distracted driving, be a voice in your community by supporting local laws or advocating for stronger ones

Take the pledge to drive cell free. Put down the phone when you are behind the wheel – it can mean the difference between life and death. https://www.nsc.org/forms/DistractedDriving-Pledge

For information/resources visit: https://www.nsc.org/road-safety/safety-topics/distracted-driving/research

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA


North Shore Health Department Highlights 4/3/2018

Did You Know?

The first full week of April each year is National Public Health Week (NPHW). This is a time to recognize the contribution that public health makes in developing healthier communities and a healthier nation. The American Public Health Association develops a campaign each year to address the public health concerns of the current year. This year’s theme is Healthiest Nation 2030. To learn how you can be a part of the movement and initiate change visit: http://www.nphw.org

Each day of NPHW has a theme. Some of the examples of things that the North Shore Health Department does within each theme are:

Behavioral Health: Advocate for and promote well-being - The NSHD is an active member of REDgen, a North Shore coalition dedicated to promoting balance and resiliency for children and teenagers, and is part of the Prevent Suicide Greater Milwaukee Coalition. The coalition promotes suicide prevention by providing education, increasing awareness, and facilitating community collaboration.

Communicable Disease: Learn about ways to prevent disease transmission- As part of Wisconsin State Statute 252-Communicable Diseases, the NSHD follows up and responds to all Category I and II diseases and conditions considered to have significant public health impact.

Environmental Health: Help to protect and maintain a healthy planet - The NSHD’s environmental health program focuses on the environmental factors that may adversely affect the health, comfort, safety or well-being of our residents. Some programs include: radon testing and outreach, food safety and licensing, lead hazard control, human health hazard investigations, beach water testing, and arbovirus surveillance.

Injury and Violence Prevention: Learn about the effects of injury and violence on health - The health department offers injury prevention programs including car seat installations, and a fall prevention program for seniors (Remembering When), in partnership with the North Shore Fire Department.      

Ensuring the Right to Health: Advocate for everyone's right to a healthy life -  Everyone deserves an opportunity to live a life free from preventable disease and disability. The places where we live, learn, work, worship and play should promote our health, not threaten it. 

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA