Highlights

North Shore Health Department Highlights 8/7/2018

Did you know…

The North Shore Health Department participates in a variety of community events throughout the summer including: National Night Out, Safety Days, Farmers’ Markets, Car Seat events, and many more. Community events build cohesion and resiliency among residents, businesses, government and community groups to make communities and neighborhoods safe and free of crime and violence. Community cohesion is the coming together of people with a shared vision and sense of belonging in which the diversity of people’s backgrounds and circumstances are valued and appreciated. Community resilience is the sustained ability of a community to utilize available resources to respond to, withstand and recover from adverse situations.  Both community cohesion and resiliency are important elements in a safe and healthy community and are fostered through fun events and activities involving the whole community. Earlier this summer we participated in Farmers’ Markets in Fox Point and Brown Deer and last week we participated in Glendale’s National Night Out. In September we will be at the Bayside Picnic on September 8th, Shorewood Farmers’ Market on September 15th and Whitefish Bay’s Farmers’ Market on September 22nd.

Kudos to Health Department Staff

Earlier this spring, Sanja Miljevic, one of the NSHD’s four Public Health Nurses, won the Carol Graham Scholarship for Emerging Leaders in Public Health Nursing. As an award recipient Sanja received a paid registration to the Wisconsin Public Health Association’s Public Health in Practice Conference. Sanja attended the conference in Stevens Point last week to develop her skills and learn of resources to improve community health. Sanja has been with the NSHD for four years and in that time has become one of our primary nurses working on communicable disease investigations, including managing several active TB patients. In her time with the Department, she has become a certified Child Passenger Safety Technician and a Rabies Control Program Trained Observer. Sanja also helped develop and onboard staff to our new scheduling and billing software system, allowing us to expand our Medicare billing options for flu vaccine. Congratulations, Sanja, on your award and your achievements in public health.



North Shore Health Department Highlights 7/31/2018

Did you know…

The North Shore Health Department receives a grant from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR), through the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to conduct beach monitoring for presence of E. coli at the three Lake Michigan beaches in our area—Atwater in Shorewood, Klode in Whitefish Bay, and Doctors in Bayside. We work with the Shorewood DPW and the North Shore Water Commission to test water at least twice a week. Signs are posted at each beach, indicating whether a beach is open (green), closed (red) or has elevated levels of E. coli detected (yellow). Current status of E. coli levels in most Wisconsin beaches, including the North Shore beaches, is available at: https://www.wibeaches.us.

In 2017, two drownings occurred on North Shore beaches. Seeing a need for more urgent response and rescue equipment, a Whitefish Bay resident, 17-year-old Matthew Pomes, worked in conjunction with the North Shore Health Department and the Village of Whitefish Bay to design and install a beach rescue equipment kiosk at Klode Beach for his Eagle Scout project. Congratulations, Matthew, and thank you for helping make Klode Beach a safer place to swim!

Photo caption: Eagle Scout Matthew Pomes and North Shore Health Director/Officer Ann Christiansen

What is the health department working on?

Last Thursday the North Shore Health Department hosted a Community Conversation at the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center to help us in developing the North Shore Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP). We had a great turnout and many suggestions for us to integrate into the CHIP.

If you were unable to make the Community Conversation, you can still view the information from posters, and provide feedback on the topic areas electronically. Visit:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NSHealthConversation.

North Shore Health Department Highlights 7/24/2018

The North Shore Health Department will be hosting a Health and Well-Being Community Conversation at the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center. Stop by between 3:00-6:30pm on Thursday, July 26, to prioritize community health issues and action steps for the North Shore Health Improvement Plan. Please register online at http://ow.ly/QkMn30kEWII or by calling (414) 371-2980.

The North Shore Health Department reports a dead crow found in Milwaukee County has tested positive for West Nile virus.  West Nile virus is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes acquire the virus by feeding on infected birds. The majority of people (80%) who are infected with West Nile virus do not get sick. Those who do become ill usually experience mild symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle ache, rash, and fatigue. Less than 1% of people infected with the virus get seriously ill with symptoms that include high fever, muscle weakness, stiff neck, disorientation, mental confusion, tremors, confusion, paralysis, and coma. Older adults and those with compromised immune systems are at greater risk of developing central nervous system illness that can be fatal.

The North Shore Health Department recommends the following:

  • Limit time spent outside at dawn and dusk, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Apply an insect repellant with DEET, IR3535, picaridin, or oil of lemon eucalyptus to exposed skin and clothing.
  • Make sure window and door screens are in good repair to prevent mosquito entry.
  • Prevent mosquitoes from breeding by removing stagnant water from items around your property, such as tin cans, plastic containers, flower pots, discarded tires, roof gutters, and downspouts.
  • Turn over wheelbarrows, wading pools, boats, and canoes when not in use.
  • Change the water in bird baths and pet dishes at least every three days.
  • Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas, and hot tubs; drain water from pool covers.
  • Landscape to prevent water from pooling in low-lying areas, and trim tall grass, weeds, and vines since mosquitoes use these areas to rest during hot daylight hours.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services will continue surveillance for West Nile virus until the end of the mosquito season. To report a sick or dead crow, blue jay, or raven, please call the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline at 1-800-433-1610.

Listen to Ann Christiansen, Health Director, discuss West Nile virus on WUMW Lake Effect:  http://wuwm.com/post/tuesday-lake-effect-spread-insect-borne-illnesses-designer-donna-ricco-royal-roost

For more information on West Nile virus: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/arboviral/westnilevirus.htm


North Shore Health Department Highlights 7/17/2018

The North Shore Health Department is hosting our first broad community discussion to help us in developing the North Shore Community Health Improvement Plan. The CHIP is a 5-year plan that identifies health priorities, develops and implements strategies to address the priorities, and lays out the means to measure health improvements.

Please consider joining us on Thursday, July 26th, 2018 at the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center where we will review the community health issues that emerged from the North Shore Community Health Assessment and discuss potential action steps for improvement. We invite you to stop by anytime between 3:00pm – 6:30pm to meet with stakeholders and staff, review the potential topic areas, and provide input on what is being or could be done to make our communities healthier and safer. If you can’t join the discussion on July 26th, please let us know as there will be other opportunities to provide input and get involved.

The event is free, but we would like everyone to register through the link on our website (https://nshealthdept.org).


To view the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment and the 2014-2019 Community Health Improvement Plan visit: http://www.nshealthdept.org/Reports.aspx



North Shore Health Department Highlights 7/10/2018

The North Shore Health Department investigates several tickborne infections including Lyme disease, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, and rocky mountain spotted fever. Lyme disease is the most frequently reported tickborne illness in Wisconsin, but numbers for the other conditions are increasing. Common symptoms of tickborne diseases may include fever, chills, muscle aches, headache and rash. Preventing tick bites is the key to reducing your risk of tickborne diseases.

  • Avoid areas with tall grass and brush where ticks are common.
  • Apply repellents that contain at least 20%–30% DEET.
  • Wear clothing treated with 0.5% permethrin.
  • Shower soon after coming indoors.
  • Perform daily checks. Check your entire body after being outside even if you were only in your yard.

It is important to remember that ticks are present in all counties in Wisconsin. People living in any county in Wisconsin can contract Lyme disease or other tick-borne diseases.

For information on how to safely remove a tick, visit https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html

For information on Lyme disease incidence in Wisconsin, visit https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/tickborne/lyme/index.htm

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 7/3/2018


Summer is in full swing and Fourth of July is here! As you celebrate with friends and family this week, it is important to remember some key safety tips about the use of fireworks. According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, 280 people on average go the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July 4th holiday. Per the North Shore Fire Department, sparklers, smoke bombs and snakes are the only fireworks that have been identified as legal in the State of Wisconsin and the North Shore. 

If you are travelling somewhere where fireworks are legal and you plan to use them, stay safe and follow these tips:

  • Obey all local laws regarding the use of fireworks.
  • Know your fireworks; read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions before igniting.
  • A responsible adult should supervise all firework activities.  Never give fireworks to children.
  • Alcohol and fireworks do not mix.  Save your alcohol for after the show.
  • Wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks.
  • Light one firework at a time and then quickly move away.
  • Use fireworks outdoors in a clear area; away from buildings and vehicles.
  • Never carry fireworks in your pocket or shoot them into metal or glass containers.

If you will be grilling for the holiday follow these steps to safely cook up treats for the backyard barbecue:

  • Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
  • Never grill indoors – not in your house, camper, tent, or any enclosed area.
  • Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.
  • Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire.
  • Use the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using grills.

For more safety tips visit: www.fireworkssafety.org, www.nfpa.org  



North Shore Health Department Highlights 6/26/2018

June 27 is National HIV Testing Day--a day to encourage people to get tested for HIV, know their status, and get linked to care and treatment. This year’s theme--Doing It My WayTesting for HIV--reminds us that each person has their own reasons why they test for HIV and their own unique ways of Doing It.

About 1.1 million people in the United States have HIV, and 1 in 7 of them don’t know it. For those living with undiagnosed HIV, testing is the first step in maintaining a healthy life and reducing HIV transmission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care and those at high risk get tested at least once a year. Some sexually active men who have sex with men may benefit from more frequent testing (every 3 to 6 months).

What can you do to prevent getting or transmitting HIV?

  • Use condoms the right way every time you have sex.
  • If you are HIV-negative but at high risk for HIV, take daily medicine to prevent HIV, called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Talk to your doctor about post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) if you think you have been exposed to HIV in the last 72 hours and are not on PrEP.
  •  Choose less risky sexual behaviors.
  • Limit your number of sexual partners.
  •  Get tested and treated for other sexually transmitted diseases.
  •  Never share syringes or other equipment to inject drugs (works).
  • Remember, abstinence (not having sex) and not sharing syringes or works are the only 100% effective ways to prevent HIV.

Where can you get tested?

If you need to get tested and have health insurance, you can visit your primary care provider.

Uninsured or Underinsured?

7171 N Teutonia Ave.
370 E Capitol Dr.
2826 N MLK Dr.
3522 W Wisconsin Ave.
2625 W National Ave.



North Shore Health Department Highlights 6/19/2018 

 In Wisconsin, the days between Memorial Day and Labor Day are generally considered prime-time for picnics and outdoor grilling. While these events are fun, it is important to keep food safety in mind if you are attending or hosting an event. Foodborne illness is a common, costly—yet preventable—public health problem. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 6 Americans get sick from contaminated foods or beverages each year. Here are some food safety tips to follow if you are planning an event or just cooking a meal for your family.  

 There are four simple rules for any kitchen: 

 Clean: Wash your hands and surfaces often.

 ·   Wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap before starting food preparation and between preparing different foods. That’s about the time it takes to sing Happy Birthday to yourself. 

 ·         Wash your utensils, cutting boards, and countertops with hot, soapy water.

 ·        Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables under running water. 

 Separate: Don’t cross-contaminate. Raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs can spread germs to ready-to-eat foods—unless you keep them separate. 

 Cook: To the right temperature. Food is safely cooked when the internal temperature gets high enough to kill germs that can make you sick. Use a food thermometer to ensure foods are cooked to a safe internal temperature. Poultry, stuffed meat, and leftovers should be cooked to 165 degrees; ground beef to 155 degrees; and fish, pork, and eggs to 145 degrees. 

 Chill: Refrigerate promptly. Keep your refrigerator below 40°F and know when to throw food out. 

 ·         Refrigerate perishable food within 2 hours. (If outdoor temperature is above 90°F, refrigerate within 1 hour.) 

 ·         Thaw frozen food safely in the refrigerator, in cold water, or in the microwave. Never thaw foods on the counter, because bacteria multiply quickly in the parts of the food that reach room temperature. 

 To get alerts on food recalls visit: https://www.fda.gov/Food/RecallsOutbreaksEmergencies/Recalls/default.htm 

 For more information on food safety visit: https://www.foodsafety.gov/index.html, https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/index.html 

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 The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. Columbia County is the first county in Wisconsin in 2018 to report a bird testing positive for West Nile Virus. Remember to take precautions when outdoors to prevent mosquito bites. Wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, socks and shoes is important and using a repellent containing permethrin or DEET will help as well. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 6/12/2018

Heat stroke, also known as sun stroke, is a type of severe heat illness that results in a body temperature greater than 104 °F and presents with confusion. Other symptoms include red, dry or damp skin, headache, dizziness and even death. Unfortunately, as the weather warms up, there is an increase in stories of children being left in hot cars. Young children, elderly adults, disabled individuals or pets left alone in a vehicle are at particular risk of succumbing to heat stroke. A car can heat up 19 degrees in just 10 minutes and cracking a window doesn’t help. Unfortunately, 37 children die each year from being left unattended in a vehicle, and all of these deaths are preventable.

Reduce the Number of Deaths from Heatstroke by Remembering to ACT

A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving a child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not inside so no one get in on their own.


C: Create reminders. Keep a stuffed animal or other memento in your child’s car seat when it’s empty, and move it to the front seat as a visual reminder when your child is in the back seat. Or place and secure your phone, briefcase or purse in the backseat when traveling with your child.


T: Take action. If you see a child or animal alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.

For more information visit: https://www.safekids.org/heatstroke, https://www.kidsandcars.org/how-kids-get-hurt/heat-stroke/, https://www.nsc.org/road-safety/safety-topics/child-passenger-safety/kids-hot-cars




North Shore Health Department Highlights 6/5/2018

The summer swimming season has started. The NSHD monitors recreational water conditions at Atwater, Klode, and Doctors Park beaches by routinely testing water for harmful levels of E. coli bacteria and posting signs to communicate water safety to the public during the summer swimming season. The NSHD works with the Shorewood Department of Public Works to test the water at each of these beaches at least twice a week from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Sampling results are provided to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and are posted on www.wibeaches.us. When you go to the beach this summer be sure to look for our signs to make sure it is safe to be in the water. There are three signs at the beach:

Green- Risk of illness from micro-organism exposure considered minimal. You should still take precautions such as: not ingesting lake water, being aware of other safety hazards associated with swimming, and--as always--swimming at your own risk.

Yellow- Risks of illness due to micro-organism exposure are somewhat elevated. Take the following precautions when the yellow placard is up: do not ingest lake water, wash hands before eating, and shower when done swimming. Be aware of other safety hazards associated with swimming, and--as always--swim at your own risk.

Red-There is an elevated risk of illness due to exposure to micro-organisms. Do not enter the water. 

Prior to swimming at any of the beaches in the North Shore, it is important to consult https://www.weather.gov/greatlakes/beachhazards for information on the weather and temperature conditions to determine current risks for swimming.

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/29/2018

May is Hepatitis Awareness Month. Hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C are three types of viral hepatitis that cause inflammation of the liver. While each can produce similar symptoms, each hepatitis virus affects the liver differently.

Unlike Hepatitis B and C which can turn into chronic illness, Hepatitis A is a short-term illness that is caused by infection with the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A was once very common in the United States, but the number of cases that occur each year is now less than 3,000. Hepatitis A is a liver disease spread by contaminated food and water.  It can also be spread from the hands of a person with hepatitis A. It is rarely spread through sexual contact. Symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and jaundice. Some people have no symptoms, while others have symptoms that last 1-6 months. Most people recover with no lasting liver damage.

Hepatitis A is easily prevented with a safe and effective vaccine, which is recommended for all children at one year of age and for adults who may be at risk, including travelers to certain international countries. Here are some tips if you are traveling overseas:

  • Avoid eating raw fruits and vegetables, and raw shellfish
  • Avoid iced drinks or adding ice to your drinks
  • Drink bottled water or boil water before drinking
  • Brush your teeth and rinse your mouth with bottled water
  • Avoid eating at unhygienic places

For more information visit: https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hepavaccinationbeforetravel.htm

https://www.vaccines.gov/diseases/hepatitis_a/index.html

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/22/2018


Did you know?

Wisconsin has declared May 2018 as Trauma-Informed Care Awareness Month and May 22, 2018 as Trauma-Informed Care Day in Wisconsin. Trauma-informed Care (TIC) is not a therapy, intervention, or specific action. It is an approach to engaging people with histories of trauma that recognizes the presence of trauma symptoms and acknowledges the role that trauma has played in their lives. Trauma is extreme stress that overwhelms a person's ability to cope. It can be an event, a series of events, or set of circumstances that harms a person's physical or emotional well-being. The essence of TIC comes down to the question of not, ‘What's wrong with you? but, ‘What happened to you?’ This shift in perspective leads to answers that get at that root cause of issues.

There are four elements of a trauma-informed approach:

Realizing the prevalence of trauma - Many individuals experience trauma during their lifetime. Nationally, 61 percent men and 51 percent of women will experience at least one trauma in their lifetime.

Recognizing how trauma affects individuals - Research shows that trauma disrupts the central nervous system and overwhelms a person's ability to cope. It often results in feeling vulnerable, helpless, and afraid. It interferes with relationships and fundamental beliefs about oneself, others, and one's place in the world.

Responding by putting this knowledge into practice - This approach lessens the blame on people who have had adverse experiences in their lives and instead acknowledges it may not be their fault they are acting badly. It shows the person that there is an understanding that their past experiences may be affecting their present behavior. This promotes healing.

Resisting traumatization - TIC takes steps to minimize situations that could cause distress or mirror the person's traumatic experiences.

To learn more about TIC visit:

https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/tic/index.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index.html

https://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/trauma-interventions

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/15/2018


Did you know?

Keeping up-to-date immunization records for yourself and your family is important. Your vaccination record provides a history of all the vaccines you received as a child and adult. This record may be required for certain jobs, travel, or school or daycare registration. Every year thousands of children and adults in the U.S. become sick from vaccine-preventable diseases which can be easily spread from person to person.

There has been an increase of cases of mumps and measles in Wisconsin in the last couple of years. The North Shore Health Department is notified when someone who lives or works in our jurisdiction tests positive for a one of these diseases. The Health Department’s job is to protect the community from getting sick and control an outbreak. To do this, local health departments have the authority to exclude individuals from public activities, such as going to work or school, if they do not provide proof of immunity. Proof of immunity includes:

  • Birth before January 1st, 1957 (unless health care personnel).
  • Serologic proof of immunity-  If you remember having measles or mumps as a child, you can get a blood test to check for your immunity. This blood test is called a titer.
  • Documentation of adequate vaccination with MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) vaccine.

In certain situation you are able to receive a post exposure vaccine to avoid exclusion from public activities. You can locate your immunization record on the Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR) https://www.dhswir.org/PR/clientSearch.do?language=en.  If you are unable to locate your record on WIR or have not received your MMR vaccine, contact your physician to discuss your record or if you should be vaccinated.

To view immunization schedules and what other vaccines you may need visit: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/8/2018

Did you know? 


May is National Stroke Awareness Month, an observance that highlights the importance of knowing the signs and symptoms of stroke and encourages people to take action. Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of severe disability. Living a healthy lifestyle (e.g., being physically active, eating more fruits and vegetables and foods low in sodium and salt, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding smoking) can reduce the chances of having a stroke. Properly managing certain medical conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, and diabetes can also lower the risk.

A stroke is an emergency – it can happen to anyone, at any time, and at any age. Save a life by having a better understanding of stroke and by knowing what signs and symptoms to look for.

Use FAST to remember the warning signs of a stroke:

F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

T—Time: If you see any of these signs, call 9-1-1 right away.

To learn more visit: https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/signs_symptoms.htm , www.stroke.org , or www.strokeassociation.org

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA

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The Dead Bird Reporting Hotline (1-800-433-1610) has been activated and will remain open through the mosquito season until October 31, 2018. As in previous years, the Dead Bird Reporting Hotline is available for Wisconsin residents to report sick or dead birds, and to facilitate West Nile virus (WNV) testing of corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays) to monitor WNV activity. 

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 5/1/2018

Did you know?

May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month.  Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. It is transmitted through the bite of certain species of blacklegged ticks.  The geographic distribution of Lyme disease is highly regional--approximately 95% of confirmed Lyme disease cases are reported from the upper Midwest, New England, and the mid-Atlantic states. There were 1,491 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Wisconsin in 2016.  Residents and travelers in areas where Lyme disease is common—including areas in Northern Wisconsin--should protect themselves. To help prevent Lyme disease, the CDC recommends the following: 

  • Avoid areas with tall grass and brush where ticks are common
  • Apply repellents that contain at least 20%–30% DEET
  • Wear clothing treated with 0.5% permethrin
  • Shower soon after coming indoors
  • Seek health care promptly if symptoms of Lyme disease develop, including fever, rash, and muscle or joint pain.

For more information on Lyme Disease, including photos of blacklegged ticks, what the characteristic Erythema rash looks like, and how to safely remove a tick, visit http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

For a map showing Lyme disease incidence in Wisconsin by county, visit https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/tickborne/lyme/2016data.htm


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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA

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