Highlights

North Shore Health Department Highlights 4/17/2018

Did you know?


April is STD (Sexually Transmitted Disease) Awareness Month. There’s no avoiding the statistics: cases of gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis are at an all-time high. Left untreated, STDs can cause increased risk of giving or getting HIV, long-term pelvic and/or abdominal pain, and inability to get pregnant, or pregnancy complications. How can you protect yourself? 

·         Vaccinating- Vaccines are safe, effective. vaccines are available for hepatitis B and HPV. Ask your doctor whether these are right for you.

·         Reducing number of sex partners- Reducing your number of sex partners can decrease your risk for STDs. It is still important that you and your partner get tested, and that you share your test results with one another. 

·         Condoms-Correct and consistent use of the male latex condom is highly effective in reducing STD transmission. Use a condom every time you have anal, vaginal, or oral sex. 

·         Mutual Monogamy- Mutual monogamy means that you agree to be sexually active with only one person, who has agreed to be sexually active only with you. 

·         Abstinence: The most reliable way to avoid infection is to not have sex.


If you are sexually active, you are at risk of infection, and testing is the only way to know if you have an STD. Many STDs are curable and all are treatable. If either you or your partner has an STD that can be cured, both of you need to start treatment immediately to avoid getting re-infected. Getting treated right away can also help avoid health problems down the road.

This year’s STD Awareness Month theme is “Treat Me Right.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourage you to ask your healthcare provider what you can do – and how you can work together – to ensure that you stay healthy. Some providers may not discuss sex or STD testing with you. Bring it up if they don’t. Arm yourself with the facts and know what you should expect.

Learn more about specific STDs at: https://www.cdc.gov/std/healthcomm/fact_sheets.htm

If you need to get tested, you can visit your primary care provider.

Uninsured or Underinsured?

Keenan Health Center, Milwaukee: Provides free screening and treatment. Visit this link to learn morehttp://city.milwaukee.gov/health/clinic-Services.htm#.V4UCMPkrK00

Brady East STD Clinic, Milwaukee: Provides free screening and treatment. Visit this link to learn morehttp://www.bestd.org/services/

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 4/10/2018

Did you know?

Drivers today are more distracted than ever. From texting to eating to settling sibling disputes in the back seat, there are countless distractions that can fatefully take your focus off the road. April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month, a united effort to recognize and eliminate preventable deaths from distracted driving. With technology advancing at a rapid pace, it is more common to have technology including cell phones, navigation systems, and other items in a vehicle. The latest statistics show motor vehicle fatalities are up 6% from 2015. More than 40,000 people were killed on our nation's roadways last year, and distracted driving is a major contributor.

What are the laws in Wisconsin?

• Texting while driving is against WI law for any driver unless operating an emergency vehicle
• Wisconsin drivers are required to use hands-free devices through areas of road construction
• Wisconsin officers can cite drivers for any distracted driving violation
• Cell phone usage while driving is prohibited for novice drivers with learner’s permits or an intermediate license
• It’s illegal to have any electronic device providing entertainment value by visual means located in the view of the driver, unless a commercial driver

We can all play a part in the fight to save lives by ending distracted driving. If you feel strongly about distracted driving, be a voice in your community by supporting local laws or advocating for stronger ones

Take the pledge to drive cell free. Put down the phone when you are behind the wheel – it can mean the difference between life and death. https://www.nsc.org/forms/DistractedDriving-Pledge

For information/resources visit: https://www.nsc.org/road-safety/safety-topics/distracted-driving/research

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA


North Shore Health Department Highlights 4/3/2018

Did You Know?

The first full week of April each year is National Public Health Week (NPHW). This is a time to recognize the contribution that public health makes in developing healthier communities and a healthier nation. The American Public Health Association develops a campaign each year to address the public health concerns of the current year. This year’s theme is Healthiest Nation 2030. To learn how you can be a part of the movement and initiate change visit: http://www.nphw.org

Each day of NPHW has a theme. Some of the examples of things that the North Shore Health Department does within each theme are:

Behavioral Health: Advocate for and promote well-being - The NSHD is an active member of REDgen, a North Shore coalition dedicated to promoting balance and resiliency for children and teenagers, and is part of the Prevent Suicide Greater Milwaukee Coalition. The coalition promotes suicide prevention by providing education, increasing awareness, and facilitating community collaboration.

Communicable Disease: Learn about ways to prevent disease transmission- As part of Wisconsin State Statute 252-Communicable Diseases, the NSHD follows up and responds to all Category I and II diseases and conditions considered to have significant public health impact.

Environmental Health: Help to protect and maintain a healthy planet - The NSHD’s environmental health program focuses on the environmental factors that may adversely affect the health, comfort, safety or well-being of our residents. Some programs include: radon testing and outreach, food safety and licensing, lead hazard control, human health hazard investigations, beach water testing, and arbovirus surveillance.

Injury and Violence Prevention: Learn about the effects of injury and violence on health - The health department offers injury prevention programs including car seat installations, and a fall prevention program for seniors (Remembering When), in partnership with the North Shore Fire Department.      

Ensuring the Right to Health: Advocate for everyone's right to a healthy life -  Everyone deserves an opportunity to live a life free from preventable disease and disability. The places where we live, learn, work, worship and play should promote our health, not threaten it. 

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The North Shore Health Department is pleased to release the 2017-2021 Community Health Assessment (CHA). CHAs are a step in the community health improvement process, where health needs and issues are identified through systematic, comprehensive data collection and analysis. Next steps include determining health priorities in partnership with the community, and then developing policies and programs to address the identified needs. View the North Shore CHA at: www.nshealthdept.org/CHA



North Shore Health Department Highlights 3/27/2018

Did You Know?

“Hepatitis” means inflammation of the liver. The liver is a vital organ that processes nutrients, filters the blood, and fights infections. When the liver is inflamed or damaged, its function can be affected. Hepatitis C is an infection of the liver that results from the Hepatitis C virus. For reasons that are not known, about 20% of people are able to clear, or get rid of, the virus without treatment in the first 6 months. Unfortunately, most people who get infected are not able to clear the Hepatitis C virus and develop a chronic, lifelong infection. Over time, chronic Hepatitis C can cause serious health problems including liver disease, liver failure, and even liver cancer.

Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with the Hepatitis C virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen by sharing needles or syringes, through blood transfusions and organ transplants before widespread screening (1992), through sexual contact, and rarely through receiving tattoos or body piercings in a non-sterile environment. In some cases, people don’t know how or when they got infected.

Hepatitis C can be treated and often cured. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent liver damage, but the only way to know if you have Hepatitis C is with a blood test for the virus. Talk to your healthcare provider about being tested for Hepatitis C if any of the following are true:

·               You were born between 1945 – 1965 (While anyone can get Hepatitis C, 3 in 4 people with Hepatitis C were born from 1945–1965).

·               You are a current or a former injection drug user, even if you injected only one time or many years ago.

  •                You received donated blood or organs before 1992.
  •                You have certain a medical condition, such as chronic liver disease and HIV or AIDS.
  •                You have abnormal liver tests or liver disease.
  •                You have been exposed to blood from a person who has Hepatitis C.
  •                You are on hemodialysis.
  •                You were born to a mother with Hepatitis C.

To learn more about Hepatitis C, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/



North Shore Health Department Highlights 3/20/2018

Did You Know?

March 18-24 is National Poison Prevention Week. This week provides an opportunity to highlight the dangers of poisonings for people of all ages.  More than 90% of poisonings occur in the home, especially in places like the bathroom, bedroom and kitchen. Educating ourselves as well as our children is the best way to help prevent poisonings.

Prevention Tips:

·         Keep medicines in their original containers and properly labeled.

·         Have a working carbon monoxide detector.

·         Wash skin after dealing with chemicals including art products, antifreeze, or cleaning solutions.

·         Wash hands and counters before and after preparing food.

·         Always use clean utensils while cooking and serving food.

·         Check insect repellent labels for DEET, a chemical that can be poisonous in large quantities.

·         Keep all chemicals, medicines, and potentially harmful substances out of reach of children.

·         Program the Poison Help Hotline (800-222-1222) into your phones.

To learn more about poisoning prevention and what to do in case of a poisoning, visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s website at: https://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/poisoning/preventiontips.htm

To look up a specific item: https://www.poisonhelp.org/help


North Shore Health Department Highlights 3/13/2018

Did You Know?

March is National Nutrition Month and the theme for 2018 is "Go Further with Food.” Preparing your foods to go further by planning meals and snacks in advance can help to reduce food loss and waste. Whether it's starting the day off right with a healthy breakfast or fueling before an athletic event, the foods you choose can make a real difference. This year's theme for National Nutrition Month encourages us to achieve the numerous benefits healthy eating habits offer, but it also urges us to find ways to cut back on food waste. Good nutrition is an important part of leading a healthy lifestyle. Combined with physical activity, your diet can help you to reach and maintain a healthy weight, reduce your risk of chronic diseases (like heart disease and cancer), and promote your overall health. Here are some tips to consider:

  1. Include a variety of healthful foods from all of the food groups on a regular basis.
  2. Consider the foods you have on hand before buying more at the store.
  3. Buy only the amount that can be eaten or frozen within a few days and plan ways to use leftovers later in the week.
  4. Be mindful of portion sizes. Eat and drink the amount that’s right for you, as MyPlate encourages us to do.
  5. Find activities that you enjoy and be physically active most days of the week.
  6. Realize the benefits of healthy eating by consulting with a registered dietitian nutritionist. RDNs can provide sound, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice to meet your lifestyle, preferences and health-related needs.

To learn more visit: www.eatright.orgwww.choosemyplate.gov

North Shore Health Department Highlights 3/6/2018

Did You Know?

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness month. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Colorectal cancer affects people in all racial and ethnic groups and is most often found in people age 50 and older. Typically, colon cancer begins as a small growth in the colon. Over time, these pre-cancerous growths, called polyps, can turn into cancer. By following the current screening guidelines, your doctor can remove these growths or find cancer in its earliest stages. A common screening method is a colonoscopy. A colonoscopy views the entire colon and polyps can be removed during the procedure if found. This procedure is usually performed every 5-10 years depending on the findings. Though it is usually recommended to start getting screened at age 50, you may need to be screened earlier depending on your family’s health history and risk factors. Check out who should be screened and when at: https://www.ccalliance.org/get-screened/who-should-be-screened-and-when/

Take steps to reduce your risk of colon cancer:

  • Eat a variety of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Fruits, vegetables and whole grains contain vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants, which may play a role in cancer prevention.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all. If you choose to drink alcohol, limit the amount of alcohol you drink to no more than one drink a day for women and two for men.
  • Stop smoking. Talk to your doctor about ways to quit that may work for you.
  • Exercise most days of the week. Try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise on most days. If you've been inactive, start slowly and build up gradually to 30 minutes. Also, talk to your doctor before starting any exercise program.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. If you are at a healthy weight, work to maintain your weight by combining a healthy diet with daily exercise. If you need to lose weight, ask your doctor about healthy ways to achieve your goal.

Learn more at:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/colon-cancer/manage/ptc-20188388

https://www.ccalliance.org/awareness-month/

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The North Shore Community Health Survey is still happening….Every three years, the health care systems and public health departments in Milwaukee County partner to gather information on the health and health behaviors of our residents. 2018 is the third year of the cycle, so a survey year. If your landline or cell phone shows a 414 area code number from “Management Decisions,” please answer the call and help us gather data to increase our knowledge and focus our resources on health issues.