Highlights

North Shore Health Department Highlights 10/10/2017

Did You Know?

With school in full swing, it is important to discuss the infectious respiratory illness called pertussis (whooping cough). Pertussis begins with cold-like symptoms, but after 1-2 weeks, pertussis can cause violent and rapid coughing, over and over, until the air is gone from the lungs and a person is forced to inhale with a loud "whooping" sound. This extreme coughing can even cause vomiting and leaves a person very tired.  The bacteria that cause pertussis are carried through the air on droplets of saliva and are spread by a sick person coughing or sneezing, or by spending time near an infected person.

Pertussis is commonly treated by antibiotics. Patients requiring treatment should be excluded from activities including school/day care until 5 days of appropriate antibiotic therapy has been completed. People who have a known exposure to pertussis should contact their physician. In some cases, prophylactic antibiotics are given to high risk contacts to prevent infection.

The best way to prevent pertussis is to get vaccinated. Children normally get 5 doses of the DTap vaccine (Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis) administered between 2 months and 6 years of age. Preteens, teens, and adults should get vaccinated with a boosted vaccine called Tdap. Tdap should also be administered to pregnant women during each pregnancy.

Read more about pertussis at http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/signs-symptoms.html

Read more about pertussis vaccines at https://www.vaccines.gov/diseases/pertussis/index.html

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Health Insurance Market Place Deadline Reminder

If you don’t have health insurance through your employer, Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or another source that provides qualifying health coverage, the Marketplace can help you get covered. The 2018 Open Enrollment Period runs from November 1, 2017 to December 15, 2017. For more information visit: https://www.healthcare.gov/quick-guide/dates-and-deadlines/


North Shore Health Department Highlights 10/3/2017

Did You Know?

October 1-7 is Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW). Each year, millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental health condition. However, mental illness affects everyone directly or indirectly through family, friends or coworkers. One in five adults experiences a mental illness in any given year. Those problems can contribute to onset of more serious long-term conditions such as major depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Approximately one-half of chronic mental illness begins by the age of 14. Unfortunately, long delays—sometimes decades—often occur between the time symptoms first appear and when people get help. Despite mental illnesses’ reach and prevalence, stigma and misunderstanding are also, unfortunately, widespread.

 Since 1990, when Congress officially established the first full week of October as MIAW, advocates have worked together to sponsor activities, large or small, to educate the public about mental illness. This year the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is promoting the theme "Into Mental Health: Inspired, Informed, Involved" during MIAW. The campaign focuses on the power of starting inspiring conversations, getting informed to know the right thing to say and encouraging people to proudly proclaim that they are #IntoMentalHealth!

One way to get involved locally is to join REDgen this Thursday at Dominican High School for a screening of the documentary “Angst: Breaking the Stigma Around Anxiety.” See more details and RSVP at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/redgen-angst-documentary-screening-tickets-37147436984

Learn more about MIAW at NAMI’s website: https://www.nami.org/miaw

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Health Insurance Market Place Deadline Reminder

If you don’t have health insurance through your employer, Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or another source that provides qualifying health coverage, the Marketplace can help you get covered. The 2018 Open Enrollment Period runs from November 1, 2017 to December 15, 2017. For more information visit: https://www.healthcare.gov/quick-guide/dates-and-deadlines/


North Shore Health Department Highlights 9/26/2017

Did You Know?

September is National Pediculosis (Head Lice) Prevention Month. Pediculosis is an infestation on the head of eggs (nits), larvae or adult lice. Lice move by crawling; they cannot hop or fly. The lice feed on human blood, which can cause severe local itching. Head lice are not known to spread disease. Pediculosis is spread most commonly by close person-to-person contact and less frequently by sharing clothing and belongings. To learn about prevention of head lice visit: https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/prevent.html

Treatment for head lice is recommended for persons diagnosed with an active infestation. All household members and other close contacts should be checked and treated if there is evidence of live lice. Many over the counter treatments exist which include pyrethrins and permethrin lotions. To learn more about this you can visit https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/treatment.html

Head Lice Information for Schools

Both the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) advocate that "no-nit" policies should be discontinued. "No-nit" policies that require a child to be free of nits before they can return to schools should be discontinued for the following reasons:

·         Many nits are more than ¼ inch from the scalp. Such nits are usually not viable and very unlikely to hatch to become crawling lice, or may in fact be empty shells, also known as 'casings'.

·         Nits are cemented to hair shafts and are very unlikely to be transferred successfully to other people.

·         The burden of unnecessary absenteeism to the students, families and communities far outweighs the risks associated with head lice.

·         Misdiagnosis of nits is very common during nit checks conducted by nonmedical personnel.

To learn more about the AAP’s recommendations for pediculosis treatment, visit: https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/AAP-Updates-Treatments-for-Head-Lice.aspx

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Health Insurance Market Place Deadline Reminder

If you don’t have health insurance through your employer, Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or another source that provides qualifying health coverage, the Marketplace can help you get covered. The 2018 Open Enrollment Period runs from November 1, 2017 to December 15, 2017. For more information visit: https://www.healthcare.gov/quick-guide/dates-and-deadlines/



North Shore Health Department Highlights 9/19/2017

Did You Know?

September 17th-23rd is National Child Passenger Safety Week. Some studies have shown that approximately 75% of child safety seats are not installed correctly. Motor vehicle injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. Many of these injuries and deaths can be prevented by proper use of car seats, booster seats, and seat belts. Use of car seats, booster seats and seat belts is the law in Wisconsin, but many are not being used correctly. Car seat information is easy to find, but it can be hard for parents and caregivers to decide which seat is best for their child. Follow these tips to ensure your child is in the right seat:

  • Choose the right direction: Rear or forward facing
  • Check the label to make sure the seat is appropriate for your child age, weight, and height
  • Know your car seat’s history
  • Make sure your car seat is installed properly. 

Visit the link below to find out what car seat is right for your child:

https://www.safekids.org/ultimate-car-seat-guide/

Find car seat handouts for families and caregivers: http://www.nshealthdept.org/Portals/NsHealthDept.org/4%20stages%20English.pdf

Visit our website at http://www.nshealthdept.org/CarSeatSafety.aspx  to learn more about car seat safety.

North Shore residents can schedule a car seat installation appointment with a certified car seat technician at the North Shore Health Department or North Shore Fire Rescue, visit http://www.nsfire.org/index.php?Schedule-a-Car-Seat-Installation-36

Anyone can schedule a car seat installation appointment through Milwaukee Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin by calling 414-231-4896

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Health Insurance Market Place Deadline Reminder

If you don’t have health insurance through your employer, Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or another source that provides qualifying health coverage, the Marketplace can help you get covered. The 2018 Open Enrollment Period runs from November 1, 2017 to December 15, 2017. For more information visit: https://www.healthcare.gov/quick-guide/dates-and-deadlines/



North Shore Health Department Highlights 9/12/2017

Did You Know?

Flu season is just around the corner!  Influenza (“the flu”) has some symptoms in common with the common cold, but it differs in that it usually comes on suddenly and more intensely.  In addition to cold symptoms, influenza symptoms can include fever, body aches, fatigue and headache.  Most people who develop influenza recover within two weeks, but in some vulnerable populations (including children, elderly, immune-compromised), the flu can result in hospitalization and even death.  The best way to protect yourself from the flu is to get vaccinated. The health department is offering flu vaccines at this time. To make an appointment call 414-371-2980 or visit our website at http://www.nshealthdept.org/NewEappt.aspx and request an appointment online. In addition to getting your flu vaccine, follow these important tips to stay healthy:

  •          Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  •          Stay home when you are sick. This is especially important if you work with a vulnerable population (i.e. elderly, children)
  •          Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  •          Wash your hands—especially before eating and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  •          Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

The health department will also be holding an open flu vaccine clinic at Nicolet High School on Saturday, October 21st from 9:00am-11:00am in the Cafeteria. Flu vaccine for children 3-18 years of age will be available at a reduced price of $10. Flu vaccine will also be available at the regular price for adults. We can bill Medicare, but all other individuals must pay with cash or check. Please visit our website at http://www.nshealthdept.org/Clinics.aspx for pricing information.

Learn more about flu at: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/index.html

Health Insurance Market Place Deadline Reminder

If you don’t have health insurance through your employer, Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or another source that provides qualifying health coverage, the Marketplace can help you get covered. The 2018 Open Enrollment Period runs from November 1, 2017 to December 15, 2017. For more information visit: https://www.healthcare.gov/quick-guide/dates-and-deadlines/


North Shore Health Department Highlights 9/5/2017

Did You Know?

Local public health departments are constantly working behind-the-scenes to prepare for emergencies. Since 2002, the Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) cooperative agreement program has provided vital resources to ensure communities can effectively respond to infectious disease outbreaks; chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear threats; and natural disasters. Working with hospitals, first responders, and other groups such as Red Cross, local health departments develop plans and conduct exercises to practice emergency situations before they happen. But we can’t do it all, and that’s why individuals also need to prepare.

This September marks the fourteenth annual National Preparedness Month, created to raise public awareness about the importance of emergency preparedness and encourage Americans to take action. Each year, throughout the month of September, more than 3,000 public and private organizations at the national, state, and local levels promote guidelines and resources on planning for and effectively responding to life-threatening disasters. Ultimately, National Preparedness Month aims to ensure every American has the skills to protect themselves and their families during an emergency.

Week one highlights the importance of individuals and families being READY. Many emergencies happen without warning, so it is important that you take steps ahead of time to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy. Three steps to being ready are:

·      Have a kit: You may not have access to food, water or electricity for several days after an emergency. Make sure to have water (1 gallon/person/day) and food (non-perishable foods; remember the can opener), plus medications, flashlights and batteries. More ideas can be found here: https://emergency.cdc.gov/preparedness/kit/disasters/

·      Make a plan: Talk to your loved ones about the steps to take in different types of emergencies and how you will contact one another.

·      Stay informed: Watch TV, check internet sites, and get a battery-operated or hand-crank radio in case of electrical failure. Make sure you get the information you need when an emergency happens.

Learn about the other weeks’ focuses at the CDC’s National Preparedness Month website: https://www.cdc.gov/phpr/npm/powerofpreparedness2017.htm


North Shore Health Department Highlights 8/29/2017

Did You Know?

Mold is a common household nuisance and is found both inside and outside in varying amounts. For some people, mold and its spores cause very few problems, while for others it can be devastating—even life threatening. As many as one third of children in the U.S., including those who are considered “healthy,” are at risk for allergic reactions to mold. Symptoms of mold allergies are similar to those of other allergies, which can make it hard to determine the cause. Symptoms include sneezing, runny nose, itchy eyes, wheezing, and coughing. However, symptoms can escalate to more serious problems such as respiratory and circulatory issues.

Mold flourishes in warm, damp environments, which is why warm summer temperatures frequently stir up mold allergies. Preventing mold is much easier than treating it. Simply cleaning up the mold is not effective if the cause of the mold has not been found and remedied.

To reduce health risks associated with mold exposure, reduce humidity in the home. Install a dehumidifier if necessary. Open windows for ventilation, but close them if the outdoor humidity levels are high. Seek out and remedy any recurrent moisture issues.

Potential sources of indoor humidity are:

  • Pipes/ Drainage—repair any leaking pipes (watch for signs of hidden leaks like water marks on ceilings or walls); make sure downspouts empty far from the house
  • Bathrooms—remove carpeting, dry spills on the floor, run an exhaust fan or open a window, check shower curtains for mold growth
  • Kitchen—check for leaks under refrigerator, dishwasher, other appliances using water
  • Household plants—check for mold growth in pots, especially in rooms that are damp and have low ventilation
  • Toys—dry all pool, bath and teething toys that are often wet; if possible, run through the dishwasher periodically
  • Sippy cups and water bottles—regularly disassemble, clean, dry, and re-assemble, as mold frequently grows around some of the smaller parts

For additional resources on mold, please visit CDC’s mold website at: https://www.cdc.gov/mold/default.htm

For information on how to clean mold in your home visit: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/mold/clean.htm

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North Shore Health Department Highlights 8/22/2017

Did You Know?

The North Shore Health Department (NSHD) has confirmed that two bats found in North Shore communities have tested positive for rabies. Both bats were captured by residents—one following contact with a human; the other with a dog.

Rabies is an infectious viral disease that can be transmitted from infected mammals to humans through a bite, scratch, or when animal saliva comes into contact with broken skin. Rabies can be found in a variety of wild animals including raccoons, opossums, foxes, and bats. It can also be transmitted to domestic animals, including cats and dogs, from contact with infected wild animals. Because bites and scratches from bats may go unnoticed, a physician should be contacted if a bat is found in the same room with a young child, an individual who is sleeping, or individuals whose contact with the bat is unknown. Treatment for human exposure to rabies is available and most effective when administered soon after a bite or exposure to a rabid animal. Rabies in humans is nearly always fatal once an infected person develops symptoms.

The health department reminds area residents to take precaution around wild or stray animals. If you find a bat or other animal that may be infected in your home, health officials advise safely capturing and containing the animal until a public health official or physician can be consulted.

To limit exposure to animals that may be infected, follow these tips:

  • Avoiding contact with wild animals such as bats, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and foxes, especially animals that exhibit evidence of illness or disease.
  • Vaccinating domestic cats and dogs against rabies, and maintaining control and supervision of your pets when outdoors.
  • Preventing bats from accessing living quarters by keeping screens in good repair and closing small openings through which bats may enter. To report human exposure to a bat or animal that may have rabies, contact your local public health department.

For more information, visit https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/rabies/index.htm

Visit the health department website at http://www.nshealthdept.org/CommunicableDiseases.aspx to get a fact sheet on rabies. 


North Shore Health Department Highlights 8/15/2017

Did You Know?

The term “obesity” is used to describe the health condition of anyone significantly above his or her ideal healthy weight. Obesity is common, serious and costly, nearly 70% of American adults are either overweight or obese. Being obese can raise blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels, lower "good" HDL cholesterol, increase blood pressure, and induce diabetes. In some people, diabetes makes other risk factors much worse. The danger of heart attack is especially high for these people.

Whether you're at risk of becoming obese, currently overweight or at a healthy weight, you can take steps to prevent unhealthy weight gain and related health problems. Even losing a few pounds can provide you with cardiovascular benefits, so every step in the right direction is a step toward healthier living. It is important to set goals and stick to them. Consider these health tips:

  • Exercise regularly. You need to get 150 to 300 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week to prevent weight gain.
  • Follow a healthy eating plan. Visit https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ to help develop a healthy eating plan.
  • Identify triggers. Identify situation that cause out of control eating and develop strategies to control these behaviors.
  • Be consistent. Sticking to your healthy-weight plan during the week, on the weekends, and amidst vacation and holidays as much as possible increases your chances of long-term success.

To learn more visit: https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/http://www.heart.orghttp://www.mayoclinic.org



North Shore Health Department Highlights 8/8/2017

Did You Know?

August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM), which highlights the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. The second week of August focuses on vaccinations for pregnant women.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) is on the rise and outbreaks are happening across the United States. In recent years, up to 1,450 infants have been hospitalized and about 10 to 20 have died each year in the United States due to pertussis. Most of these deaths are among infants who are too young to be protected by the childhood pertussis vaccine series that starts when infants are 2 months old. These first few months of life are when infants are at greatest risk of contracting pertussis and having severe, potentially life-threatening complications from the infection.

To help protect babies during this time when they are most vulnerable, women should get the tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during each pregnancy. Getting the Tdap vaccine during the third trimester of pregnancy passes antibodies to the baby which will protect him or her for the vulnerable first few months of life.

Another vaccine that is important for pregnant women to receive is the annual influenza (flu) shot. Influenza can have serious complications in pregnant women, including hospitalization, pneumonia, and preterm birth. Vaccination can protect both pregnant mothers and their babies from flu and flu-related complications.

Both vaccines should be up-to-date for those around babies as well. When those who surround a vulnerable person are immunized, it decreases the chance of exposure. This is called cocooning.

Learn more about prenatal vaccines at the CDC’s website: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pregnancy/pregnant-women/index.html



North Shore Health Department Highlights 8/1/2017

Did You Know?

August 1-7, 2017 is the 25th annual World Breastfeeding Week (WBW).  This week begins National Breastfeeding Month, which concludes with Black Breastfeeding week (August 25th-31st).  WBW is now celebrated in over 170 countries.  2017 is the second year revolving around the theme Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development. This theme celebrates links between breastfeeding and the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, which are a blueprint for global commitment and action towards equitable development. Learn more about the links between breastfeeding and each of the Sustainable Development Goals at: http://worldbreastfeedingweek.org/

The North Shore Health Department has a Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace Recognition Program.  If you are a North Shore business, or work for one, please consider contacting us about becoming recognized as a breastfeeding friendly workplace.  We work with businesses to evaluate current facilities and policies and assist with making additions to achieve a gold, silver or bronze level commendation.  Read more about the program on our website at:  http://www.nshealthdept.org/Breastfeeding.aspx

You are invited to join other breastfeeding supporters in Milwaukee County on Saturday, August 5th at this year’s Community Breastfeeding Walk from Alice’s Garden to Fondy Food Center. More details are available on the Milwaukee County Breastfeeding Coalition’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MCBCoalition/